Business advice

Business advice

If you sell goods or services to consumers, you need to know the Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013. These require you to give your customers prior information about the goods or services you are supplying. Under certain circumstances your customers may also be entitled to a cooling off period.

The law divides consumer contracts in to one of three types – follow the links below for further guidance.

Free, impartial advice for businesses that sell goods and/or supply services to consumers (link opens in new window)

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empty (link opens in new window)empty (link opens in new window)Consumer contracts - On-premises sales (link opens in new window)

Consumer contracts - Off-premises sales (link opens in new window)

Consumer contracts - Distance sales (link opens in new window)

The Consumer Rights Act 2015 sets out your obligations to your customers when things go wrong, and the remedies they can seek to put things right. A contract may fall into one or more of the following categories.

The sale and supply of goods (link opens in new window)

The supply of services (link opens in new window)

Digital content (link opens in new window)

Unfair terms in consumer contracts

It is common for contracts for services to include terms and conditions which may attempt to exclude or limit liability for breach of contract, injury, damage etc. A consumer is not bound by a standard term in a contract with you (a trader) if it unfairly weights the contract against them. See more information on unfair contract terms (link opens in new window).

Public protection

Download our Public Protection Enforcement Policy (PDF 65.5KB) .

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